United States - Registry Seals

The first "official seal" of the United States was the green Registry Seal, issued in 1872. It was intended to be used as a security device to seal the backflaps of special "Registered Package Envelopes" to prevent tampering with the enclosed registered letters, which often contained cash. The need for the use of Registry Seals ended after only three years, when a new envelope design was introduced that did not require that a label be used to secure the flap.



Catalog: Scott #OXF1

Date issued: 1872

Printing: Green on white wove paper

Perforation: 12

Inscription: "POST / OFFICE / DEPARTMENT / UNITED / STATES / OF AMERICA / * STAMP HERE * / DATE AND PLACE OF MAILING" with the word "REGISTERED" in large letters across face

Control Number: None

Description: Mint single.



Catalog: Scott #OXF1

Date issued: 1872

Printing: Green on white wove paper

Perforation: 12

Inscription: "POST / OFFICE / DEPARTMENT / UNITED / STATES / OF AMERICA / * STAMP HERE * / DATE AND PLACE OF MAILING" with the word "REGISTERED" in large letters across face

Control Number: None

Description: Registry seal with March 7, (1874) Wells, VT circular datestamp on reverse of first type Registered Package Envelope, printed by Morgan Envelope Company of Springfield, CT. Morgan pouches can be easily recognized by the serifed "REGISTERED PACKAGE" font on the seal side. They also bear the name "W.H.H. Terrell, Third Assistant Postmaster General" on the reverse.


Catalog: Scott #OXF1

Date issued: 1872

Printing: Green on white wove paper

Perforation: 12

Inscription: "POST / OFFICE / DEPARTMENT / UNITED / STATES / OF AMERICA / * STAMP HERE * / DATE AND PLACE OF MAILING" with the word "REGISTERED" in large letters across face

Control Number: None

Description: Registry seal with May 14, (1874) Elizabethtown, NY circular datestamp on reverse of second type Registered Package Envelope, printed by George Nesbitt & Company of New York. Nesbitt pouches can be distinguished by the sans-serif "REGISTERED PACKAGE" font on the seal side. They also have the name "E.W. Barber, Third Assistant Postmaster General" on the reverse.

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by T. Hirn
E-mail:thirn@poseal.com

Updated May 25, 2008